Written by LDS, May 2015

“Little masterpieces, that’s what they were. The jewels of the cities and the high streets. Dressed with a stunning precision that spelt obsessive, a minefield of detail from head to toe, a work of art encased in mohair and existing for clothes, music and kicks, Mods listened to the best music, danced the best dances and helped transform British cultural life”.

 

(Paulo Hewitt on the Gen-1 Mods in ‘A Mod Anthology’, 1999)

Mods
Mods

So lets continue from where we left off in Mods (Issue 1). We’re currently still in London, the epicentre of a youth rebellion. Its now the early Sixties and change is vogue with major developments just around the corner. The social demographic has shifted to a more youthful Britain following the baby-boom of the Second World War (By the mid-1960’s around 40% of the population were under the age of 25!) and following the Anglo-American Loan (US$57m in today’s money) vast improvements in the social-economic state of the UK were now evident meaning that the kids of the lower ranks of society had it far better than any generation before them had ever known!

“He was fifteen and he was the best-dressed man in the whole big building. He spent more money on clothes in a week than they spent in a month – despite the disparity between their expense account padded salaries and the handful of peanuts in his wage packet…. What was the point of wearing a suit if you looked like a sack of potatoes in it?”

(Tony Parsons in ‘Limelight Blues’)

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Re-published with love by Vanessa Burton & LDS, March 2015

Flicking through a copy of New Zealand’s LIFE Magazine from 24 July, 1967 a quite incredible story stands out on one of the most influential pop bands of our lifetime. It is written at a very interesting time, the turning point of a very sharp decade, a period where psychedelia and exploration gave new aspect and provides great insight into the changing mood and evolution of the most famous pop band of our time.

Written by LDS, Feb 2015

Without the Modernist subculture and the spark it generated, Britain’s soul would today remain a conservative grey; sterile in expression, decisively bland in flavour, humbled by a collapsed Empire. The curious and hungry spirit for something new amongst the earliest Mods eventually presented Britain’s stiff upper lip a new bosom to caress. This is the first part of a small series where we will take you through the back story of what Mod really is and how it developed into the coolest subculture in Britain and beyond.

(Authors Note – LDS, Feb 15)